Windows Phone 7 SDK First Impressions

by Jon Davis 25. April 2010 13:20

A couple co-workers and I had a couple days’ opportunity at my day job to tinker with creating a Windows Phone 7 app as a proof of concept. We successfully created an app that lets you find and purchase a company product (complete with checkout, although the checkout part was web-based), access account information via a web interface, and contact customer support via either an e-mail form or a “Call Us” button that, yes, would dial customer support via the Phone function of the device. (Strangely, the Phone part was the only part that did not work nor give any “Not implemented” nor “Not supported” feedback.)

We accomplished all that in two days, plus some reading up on XAML knowledge (i.e. I’d spent the entire prior Saturday wading through the Petzold PDF that had been linked from the developer web site .. where is that Petzold PDF link now?), plus some insider knowledge of existing APIs and some preexisting web interfaces used with other mobile devices. The only huge hold-up for us, as far as I was concerned, was the learning curve of the tool chain. I mean, it’s C# which I’m fluent in, but it’s also XAML which I’ve used but never mastered, and it’s brand-new Silverlight 4.0 (a binary-incompatible derivative thereof, I think). And I’m still pretty green to MVVM and still don’t understand a lot of the basics of MVVM such as how and when to use ICommand, etc. But we got a prototype built, with only two days to do it.

That said and done, however, I walked away from that little mini-project with a few opinions. A couple years ago I tinkered with iPhone development with the Xcode / Obj-C / Interface Builder tool chain, so I have the two phone SDK experiences to compare.

One theme – “minimalistic” – to rule them all?

My immediate observation is that the UI aesthetic guidance in the Apple toolchain is nowhere to be seen in Microsoft’s toolchain, and I expect this will hurt Microsoft. Sure, Microsoft pre-packages a couple white-on-black templates as an aesthetic suggestion to get you started with a basic theme. But that’s where guidance ends. You’re given a few XAML controls to get you started, and everything starts at a bland white-on-black. A button, for example, it’s just a white rectangle, no gradient, no border bezel, same story as the white-square-on-a-white-line slider control, all to reinforce the idea that white-on-black is good because OLED displays consume 50% as much energy this way versus 3x more energy if everything displays in full color.

image 
Wow, Microsoft, you outdid yourselves here, that is a
beautiful slider handle! (Not.)

And on that latter note, why didn’t Microsoft innovate here, such as this: as soon as the user interacts with the device, for a full 15-30 seconds everything’s in rich, full color, then after 30 seconds of inactivity the view goes into “interactive screen saver” mode whereby the colors fade to inverse and you see the color scheme that’s on the device color scheme now? Toggle this behavior for your app or navigation “page” in the SDK with a boolean switch and a timespan setting. Just a thought.

Whereas, with Apple, in Interface Builder (Apple’s GUI designer) you’re given a nice big library of richly colored controls and widgets including a nice tab control on the bottom, a header control on top where you can have your richly labeled back and forward buttons, and a number of nice interactive controls such as a “checkbox” that actually renders as a beautifully detailed ON/OFF slider, complete with simulated physics and even a drop shadow on the moving slider.

It’s not the absence of aesthetic tooling that bothers me here. Actually, Microsoft opened the door wide open to aesthetic freedom, as XAML richly supports deliciously detailed interactive graphics with Expression Blend and the like. My issue is the fact that other than “minimalistic white-on-black” there is no guidance, which is an issue that plagued Windows Mobile 6 and previous Windows Mobile flavors. You will have some beautiful Windows Phone 7 apps like the Foursquare app, and then you will have some apps from people who learned Silverlight and go nuts with gradients and bright, flashy, ugly designs, or who simply ported their Silverlight apps straight over to the Windows Phone 7 SDK. Aesthetic inconsistency is going to be a nuisance. This happened in Apple’s developer community, too, but you’re almost required to do this with the Windows Phone 7 SDK because the prefab tooling in the Windows Phone 7 SDK is, at least so far, incomplete. Then again, this is still just a CTP (a beta), so we don’t know how much more complete the SDK will be on its release.

The SDK comes also with a “list application” template, which demonstrates how to have that pretty list that has the 3D rotating items when you tap on them or navigate around. That was really neat, but then I found myself scratching my head wondering how to make that behavior stick across the rest of the application? Can I declare this animation/storyboard definition once and reference it with a one-line behavioral reference of some kind across all of my “navigation pages”? If so, that was not demonstrated at all, and it looked like I’d have to copy and paste everything in the templated demonstration to each and every page I’d create. We ultimately just ignored the animation code, saddened that only the “root menu” showed this animation, because it’s really not worth it to copy/paste so much code (about 50 lines of XAML) everywhere, making a mess of the markup.

No HTML DOM interaction

My other complaint is with the Silverlight 4 web browser component. It is truly wonderful that Silverlight has an integrated web browser component, and I adore Microsoft for adding it especially for the Windows Phone 7 SDK, as it’s absolutely necessary to integrate the web browser with many Internet-enabled applications. That said, however, I found no easy way of interacting with the DOM from the Silverlight CLR. In Windows’ Internet Explorer, you had to make a separate COM reference to mshtml.dll before you could interact with the DOM. I used to do this heavily. Perhaps I’m spoiled. But not having access to the document interface and, as far as I can tell, only being able to navigate and toggle scripting support really worries me that my hands will be tied here. It was, after all, Microsoft who invented dynamic HTML with fully dynamic content back in Internet Explorer 4, when Microsoft’s innovation inspired me so much that I decided to go all-out into being a web developer. That was way over a decade ago. I still want that power; XAML doesn’t always cut it.

Silverlight (and XNA) awesomesauce in a bag

I didn’t have a chance to play with XNA on WP7 much yet, but just knowing that support for XNA is there is very exciting. XNA is a fantastic platform to build games on, as it is approachable even for a beginning developer. My only complaint about XNA is that there is no virtual keyboard support. I did verify by fiddling with it that the physical keyboard seems to be exposed in the XNA API, though.

Despite my complaints about the WP7 SDK, WP7 is going to be a game changer, and a huge hit for the developer community, I’m sure of it, simply because it allows you to leverage your existing C# or VB.NET skills and prototype functional software on the device with beauty and finesse. Heck, you can even leverage Ruby skills for it. For some unknown reason, IronPython won’t run on it yet; I’m sure support for that will come before RTM, particularly given the volume of feedback for it.

But you could already?

Actually, C# developers have been able to write Windows Mobile software quickly and easily for years, albeit not with Silverlight nor with XNA. Windows Mobile has lost the market share, consumer sales is now akin to Linux’s market share on the desktop—about 2%. Microsoft is going to have to work hard—harder than they have worked so far, from what I can see—at winning over people to the Windows Phone 7 away from the iPhone, which now takes up a huge chunk of the mobile market share. They have to compete as well with the Android which already sought to compete with the iPhone, Blackberry, and Windows Mobile, and is doing one incredibly good job at doing so.

Frankly, looking at the iPhone 3GS vs. Nexus One (Google Phone) demos, I can’t help but look at the Windows Phone 7 and laugh at it. Windows Mobile 6 may have had the awful Start menu, the most ridiculous interface ever to have been put onto a mobile device, but with that stupid Start menu the platform also retained the “many apps and their icons” notion of an application playground which is strong in the iPhone and Android as well but not so easy to find in WP7. I have difficulty seeing how a marketplace would even work for WP7—will installed apps be categorized and the user would find their installed apps by category? Surely WP7 will not just throw all apps into one giant vertical list, oh good grief, please tell me no!!

Microsoft has also been alienating people who identify things based on icons rather than text. The Live applications team have demonstrated this, for example, by dropping icons completely. In so doing, Microsoft is also alienating the international communities. Sure, text can be translated, but it doesn’t make a particularly great sell when the first impressions of an interface are of gobs and gobs of Engrish text and you don’t speak Engrish. Meanwhile, many of us who do speak English still prefer attractive icons over avant-garde lower-case text headings. When you have five or so menu items in 72 point font size, it’s fine, but when you’re trying to find something among 200 others, nothing beats the simple icon. Throwing away the simple icon on a grid won’t make this reality go away; this is not like a floppy drive, it is actually essential.

WP7’s minimalistic interface could actually end up being its downfall. They’re taking a huge chance and risk. I’m hopeful, but sadly slightly doubtful, that it will be enough to throw Microsoft back into the playing field.

Starting over

Maybe I’m just not getting it. Actually, Microsoft’s new direction has had me scratching my head so much that I’m convinced that I’m still struggling to get it, and that actually all of my concerns are quite intentional for Microsoft’s part.

This video demonstrates this quite well. Microsoft wants to “start over” not just with their SDK but with deemphasizing standalone installed apps and reinforcing the notion of a phone whereby the many apps are not just active but are integrated with each other.

The only problem is, I don’t see such cross-app integration demonstrated in the SDK, at least not up front, not yet. Also, why should I as a developer be excited about this new direction if the apps—my development efforts, and yours—are deemphasized in favor of prefab packaging?

Stoked and confused

Overall, I’m both stoked and confused. This is an exciting time to delve into this new technology from Microsoft. Microsoft really needs to fill in some holes, though, and these holes are less technological than they are design.  Their design and marketplace support strategies seem very vague.

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C# | Windows Phone | Silverlight

Silverlight 3: 3D support has buggy occlusion?

by Jon Davis 10. July 2009 14:07

I just downloaded Silverlight 3 and Blend 3. First thing I did was try out one of the samples. I grabbed the Zune 3D sample, then ran F5 to run it. I was able to spin the Zune model by dragging the mouse from the base of the model. But then I immediately noticed that it doesn't look right. The arrows and artwork that are on the sides of the model do not get properly occluded while the whole thing is spun. The artwork occludes too soon, and the arrows don't occlude at all.

Could be a bug in the sample. But could be a glitch in Silverlight itself. I wonder?

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Silverlight

Silverlight 3: 3D Support, But Is This True 3D?

by Jon Davis 6. December 2008 13:49

Just a couple days after my repeat whine about Silverlight not having a rasterization API and 3D support I saw that Scott Guthrie announced that Silverlight 3 will offer "3D support and GPU hardware acceleration". I nearly crapped my pants when I read that. :)

What's not clear is whether 3D support will come via GPU hardware acceleration. I'm of the firm mindset that true 3D is OpenGL or Direct3D; anything else is fake. So if GPU hardware accleration is fully applied to the 3D support, it may be using OpenGL / D3D under the covers.

Otherwise, I'm just going to assume that the so-called GPU acceleration is intended to assist in video playback and vector graphics. And I only base that assumption on the fact that Adobe Flash "supports 3D" (has an API) but its hardware acceleration is limited to video playback and vector graphics. And I'm honestly not familiar with graphics acceleration on vector graphics, how that works, but given that they claim it, I believe it's feasible.

To be honest, I think it would be just about as bad if GPU acceleration was applied to 3D support but not to vector graphics.

Now on "rasterization", I over-use the word really, but all I wish for is two things: a mutable bitmap buffer, where we can plot pixels, and the ability to take "snapshots" of the vector brushes being displayed (i.e. myEllipsis.ToBitmap()) and export them to the same bitmap feature. This buffer should be reusable for textures on vector artwork as well as the coming 3D support. This is NOT an advanced component that would grow the framework, such a thing is EXTREMELY simple, particularly considering that Silverlight already supports images and manages bitmaps under the covers, it's just so heavily encapsulated that you're limited to URL maps and embedded files. I'm not asking for GDI+ functions! I just want to be able to retain a bitmap in memory and reuse it, and maybe be able to modify it by plotting pixels. There is no workaround for this; one could create his own bitmap class and write to a data stream but then Silverlight still can't use it (without persisting the data stream somewhere) because it's limited to URLs and embedded files!!

I'm starting to get a better picture of Microsoft in the Silverlight context lately. While I greatly respect Microsoft's tools and capacity to think brilliantly, as well as their enthusiast division(s) (XNA, Zune, Xbox, Games for Windows, etc), I think the fact that their enthuiasts division(s) are not very involved in the Silverlight product is seriously undermining the adoptability of Silverlight in competition with Flash. I acknowledge that there's not a lot of money to be made from it, but I at least consider it good marketing.

But on the enterprise business side, I truthfully cannot give Silverlight credit for meeting demand yet, despite the remarkable uses some have found of it (with some effort), because of the lack of high-level controls and APIs, although I fully respect and appreciate the fact that it is on track to meet demand. The new Controls Toolkit is great, but the controls as demonstrated in the samples, and the preexisting datagrid as demonstrated by normal use, all demonstrate that Silverlight has performance issues. Performance issues are of serious concern in business environments every bit as much as in enthusiast niches because it amounts to decreases in usability, which in turn amounts to turned off customers and ultimately lost profits. An example of this is the horrible scrolling performance issue, most seen in the datagrid, although I've come to realize that Silverlight's scrolling performance issues seem to have been improved somewhat since the last beta (when I stopped watching Silverlight because I was so turned off). Still, not improved enough. The Silverlight datagrid looks good until you touch it, and then makes your computer feel like something from the late 90s.

Actually, scrolling is only one example. It's user responsiveness on the whole; buttons have a similar problem. Actually, all the input objects have the problem. In general, while I don't question nor doubt Silverlight's capacity to look beautiful or to have very high FPS animations, etc., I think where it doesn't shine at all is in user input responsiveness. There are exceptions. Microsofts and Silverlight enthusiasts will always have some great demos lying around. But generally I've noticed a problem with user responsiveness, particularly when scrolling or dragging comes into play.

It's not a dealbreaker issue; not so bad that it's unusable. It's just bad enough to keep me from using Silverlight in everything I do. I prefer DHTML and its less-sexy appearance. Responsiveness is more important than appearance, and AJAX gets the job done in most cases. Silverlight meanwhile can fill in gaps where Javascript can't cut it, but then, so can Flash, and by the time you're already choosing to stick with HTML for the basics there's no compelling reason to use Silverlight except for the CLR and WMV support.

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C# | Silverlight

LINQ-to-SQL On The Web Client

by Jon Davis 4. December 2008 09:29

This is really old news, but something I didn't realize until last night at a Silverlight users group meeting.

Silverlight 2.0 brought us LINQ-to-Objects and LINQ-to-XML on the client. Bravo, yay, etc., but obviously LINQ-to-SQL was out of the question because you can't make an Internet-based T-SQL connection (i.e. over port 1433), for obvious reasons (*cough* security).

But Service Pack 1 for Visual Studio 2008, which introduced ADO.NET Data Services, also brought in along with it transparent LINQ-to-SQL support over WCF. This to me is bizzare. I haven't tried it, I only heard it mentioned. Frankly I'm worried about security, still, as it sounds a lot like RDO (Remote Data Objects) from back in the ASP Classic / ActiveX days, and which turned out to be a huge security disaster. Nonetheless, I'm still curious about how this might work securely and how it might make the workflow of a modern-age developer much, MUCH more pleasant than manually wiring up WCF for data synchronization to begin with.

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C# | Web Development

Silverlight Still Needs 3D and Drawing API

by Jon Davis 4. November 2008 07:12

I'm gonna make this short and sweet. [EDIT: Or I thought I would.] I complained a year or so ago that the Silverlight roadmap needs to include 3D support, ideally with hardware acceleration (such as with OpenGL) and a drawing API that doesn't force you to use XAML semantics or canvas controls or other such things. More specifically, I suggested a rastarization API.

I said these things because I've seen people clamoring for such things for a long time in online entertainment and online utilities, but not from Microsoft, rather from Java applets and, more recently, Flash.

Microsoft's responses seemed to be, "Ahh pooh pooh!! What is the bUsINess nEEd?" and, "It's haaaawwrrrd!!" The latter being in relation to minimizing the codebase.

Seems Adobe was listening, though. Flash 10 adds these new features as part of the core feature set.
  • 3D effects and support. (I don't think it is OpenGL-accelerated, but at least it's there and the software renderer performs well.)
  • Enhanced drawing API ("Developers can tweak parts of curves, change styling, replace parts, and use custom filters and effects, delivering improved throughput, creative control, and greater productivity. Enhancements to the Drawing API add the z dimension, real perspective, textured meshes in 3D space, a retained graphics model, read/write rendering, and triangle drawing with UV coordinates, while adding memory and improving performance.")
  • Enhanced 2D hardware acceleration; "to paint SWF files into the browser and accelerate compositing calculations of bitmaps, filters, blend modes, and video overlays faster than would be performed in software".

Adobe's not resting on Macromedia's laurels. Silverlight 2 has some hard core competition here. Let's see if Microsoft makes the mistake of resting on Silverlight 2's laurels.

Now I'm not a Silverlight expert (still), I've had some exposure to Silverlight and have shared some light and simple blog posts but nothing special. So I might be unaware of some drawing APIs that were actually made available since my rant. I know that some real-time rasterization is possible, as is proven by Quake for Silverlight [2]. But I'm not persuaded that this Quake for Silverlight is properly optimized. In fact, I'm still scratching my head as to how it was pulled off.

Personally I'd love to see it if Silverlight and XNA consolidated agendas, although I know for certain that technically that's an impossibility (XNA is significantly platform-oriented). Microsoft needs to pay attention to Unity 3D. Unity 3D has an XNA-like runtime (full 3D support), games built with it are written in C#, and they can deploy to a web browser plug-in just like Silverlight 2, even with support for both Mac and Windows. One might say, "Why not just use Unity?" I would. Unity 3D, requiring a Mac for development, is one of the two reasons (it and the iPhone) why I bought a Mac Mini and even considered abandoning Windows. For that matter, I suppose I have abandoned Windows in a sense; for the last few months I've been using my Mac rather than Windows for my free time. But I've come to realize that I've put all my investments into Microsoft tools, and I don't want to keep spending any more money on non-Microsoft tools when I already have my hands full trying to keep up with the Microsoft tools evolution.

So in the end I wind up with being grateful for great games published by people who use a Mac, and enjoy my iPhone, but I can't do anything like any of those because I'm too distracted with Microsoft tech "evolution", the Zune doesn't have a phone, Windows Mobile doesn't have decent UI standards (where iPhone sets the bar), and for web-based games and 3D presentations Silverlight isn't up to par.

At least I have other things to think about and keep me distracted from these distractions. Like non-game technologies like ASP.NET. *sigh*

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New York Times proves out Silverlight integration in a native Mac application

by Jon Davis 24. May 2008 19:46

New York Times has migrated their popular WPF-based New York Times Reader to the Mac, using Silverlight and native Cocoa windowing and application logic, and using the Safari / WebKit API as a Silverlight wrapper. (Darn it, I knew it was both doable and legal!)

http://firstlook.nytimes.com/?p=49 

It doesn't have the text flow feature that WPF was so fantastically good at, but being as text flow is rumored as "coming soon", either for NY Times' reader or for Silverlight, I'm pretty excited about the future of that. 

I blogged about the feasability of this (native, non-web cross-platform apps with Silverlight rendering) just days ago, motivating myself to outright buy a Mac since I didn't see anyone bothering to try. Now that someone has not only tried but succeeded and released a significant product based on it, I feel a little mixed -- part bummed that I didn't get to post first-discoveries, but part excited that Silverlight has potential for an Adobe AIR-like wrapper, both technically and legally.

The NY Times Reader for Mac sure isn't running on WPF, though, and it shows. The user experience is clunky and the lack of text flow is painful (try resizing the window or scaling the text). The whole thing is nothing like the WPF version, except only for the initial screenshot appearance (without interacting) and, perhaps, the actual content.

kick it on DotNetKicks.com

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Microsoft Windows | Web Development | Mac OS X | WPF

EntitySpaces and Silverlight Demo - Part 2

by Jon Davis 23. May 2008 20:57

Mike Griffin at EntitySpaces has posted Part 2 of my EntitySpaces + Silverlight tutorial.

http://www.entityspaces.net/blog/2008/05/24/EntitySpaces+And+Silverlight+Demo+Part+2.aspx  kick it on DotNetKicks.com

It barely touches on the purest basics of filtering and updating data with Silverlight, EntitySpaces, WCF, and LINQ.

Not a whole lot to it, there's SO MUCH more that ES (particularly), Silverlight 2, WCF, and LINQ have to offer, but it's good quick-and-dirty tutorial knowledge nonetheless.

And no, I haven't been slaving away at this second part of the tutorial all this time. I finished it a long while back, its posting was delayed for various reasons not related to the demo/tutorial. I might still yet get into some advanced tutorials but we'll see. 

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Software Development | Web Development

Embeddable Cross-Platform Silverlight

by Jon Davis 15. May 2008 00:02

I've been wanting to start discovering cross-platform development with Mono, MonoDevelop, Gecko#, C++, XPCOM, XUL, XULRunner, WebKit, et al. I have a couple vaporware apps in mind and I have just purchased a Mac Mini and an iPhone mainly for this purpose. And meanwhile since Silverlight happens to be cross-platform as well, I was curious about its licensing. Theoretically, one can accomplish an Adobe AIR-like cross-platform application implementation using Silverlight and XUL or WebKit. Problem is, I had heard that Silverlight was explicitly written to disallow it from being used on anything but a standard HTML web browser (Safari, Firefox, Internet Explorer).

After spending an hour or so poking at the n00b tutorials on XUL and XPCOM, I went to the Silverlight site and spent several minutes looking everywhere for the darn EULA. (Sadly, after finding it, once I hopped on this blog editor I lost it and it took another 15 minutes to find it again.)

http://www.microsoft.com/silverlight/resources/LicenseWin.aspx and http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/silverlight/cc307279.aspx

I didn't see any such limitation there, nothing about "thou shalt only use Silverlight in a 'standard web browser', namely Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Safari".  There are some limitations, of course, such as perhaps redistribution, which theoretically if the app is a XUL app can be deal with using HTML+JS+XUL+XPI, getting Silverlight into thinking it's downloading and installing itself through and onto Firefox. (All theory, of course.)

On a side topic, if anyone out there is reading this, can someone tell me why there are almost no open discussions correlating XUL and XAML/WPF? They seem to attempt to do the same basic function--create apps using XML and components--albeit WPF is far more powerful and versatile in itself as a tool in its niche, whereas XUL is Javascript/HTML friendly and is cross-platform.

UPDATE: After discussing with a buddy who's done cross-platform .NET programming with Mono, apparently Glade + GTK# has an XML markup language that also meets the same objective.

On second thought, maybe I just wasn't searching hard enough. I see a lot of hits here: http://www.google.com/search?q=xul+vs+xaml

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Pet Projects | Computers and Internet | Software Development | Linux | Cool Tools | Web Development

EntitySpaces on Silverlight 2: Part One

by Jon Davis 4. May 2008 18:25

I managed to get EntitySpaces running on Silverlight over WCF client proxies. I documented the steps as a tutorial and Mike Griffin at EntitySpaces posted it up on the EntitySpaces blog.

http://www.entityspaces.net/blog/2008/05/05/EntitySpacesAndSilverlightDemoPart1.aspx kick it on DotNetKicks.com 

Demo here: http://developer.entityspaces.net/ES2008/Demos/Silverlight/PartOne/

I retained my Word doc so I can retain my personal preference of formatting, fix typos, and add a few annotations and disclaimers here and there like, "So far these steps don’t lend themselves very well to an offline development workflow. Finding a more appropriate workflow pattern, though, is beyond the scope of this initiative. (Good luck.)" We can thank Microsoft for making WCF on IIS 7 such a pain in the behind for binding service endpoints, without any code generation or GUIfication. But enough whining, client-side business objects in Silverlight is a hawt approach to LOB RIAs.

http://www.jondavis.net/misc/EntitySpaces and Silverlight Demo - Part 1.doc

Part two will be short 'n sweet but much more focused on actually working with EntitySpaces. This part didn't give ES justice...

EntitySpaces RIA running in Safari 3.1 (on Windows) with just about 20 lines of hand-written client-server code and XAML markup:

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Pet Projects | Computers and Internet | Software Development | Cool Tools | Web Development

ScottGu's Scottsdale '08 Presentations Now Posted

by Jon Davis 25. March 2008 09:51

ScottGu's presentations from his Scottsdale presentations here are now posted. http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2008/03/09/my-presentations-in-arizona-this-tuesday.aspx

I was there. Yay me. Sadly, though, I was with some co-workers who wanted to sit in the back. I couldn't see.

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Software Development | Web Development


 

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About the author

Jon Davis (aka "stimpy77") has been a programmer, developer, and consultant for web and Windows software solutions professionally since 1997, with experience ranging from OS and hardware support to DHTML programming to IIS/ASP web apps to Java network programming to Visual Basic applications to C# desktop apps.
 
Software in all forms is also his sole hobby, whether playing PC games or tinkering with programming them. "I was playing Defender on the Commodore 64," he reminisces, "when I decided at the age of 12 or so that I want to be a computer programmer when I grow up."

Jon was previously employed as a senior .NET developer at a very well-known Internet services company whom you're more likely than not to have directly done business with. However, this blog and all of jondavis.net have no affiliation with, and are not representative of, his former employer in any way.

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