PowerShell 2 In Windows 7 Comes With A Windows Shell

by Jon Davis 1. September 2009 01:48

Here’s something I overlooked about Windows 7 RTM. Not only does it comes with PowerShell v2 (I didn’t overlook that) but it also comes with an “ISE”—an Integrated Shell Environment. The “ISE” gives you three “panes” or sub-windows to work with PowerShell from within a single containing window: an input console, an output console, and a syntax highlighting text editor for script editing and debugging.

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It does let you specify a layout. However, firing this thing up I immediately felt like I was stuck in Windows Live applications’ CandyLand. It has a notably consumer feel, and I’m afraid that system administrators and developers will tend to shy away from it simply because of that. Why Microsoft didn’t just reuse their Visual Studio Integrated Shell is beyond me.

Nonetheless, this is a nice addition to the Windows 7 and PowerShell combination/suite and will no doubt prove to be very handy for those who want to casually tinker with PS scripting without several different windows open or dishing out dough for the basic functionality of a PS script debugger.

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Another much wanted feature finally arrives: Remote PS Shells

 

I’m still eyeing PowerShell Plus, albeit just a tiny fraction of a hair less now because of this.

Windows 7 Will Thrash SSD-Based Systems (And Microsoft Won't Fix It)

by Jon Davis 16. February 2009 00:50

A couple weeks ago I successfully installed Windows 7 on my Dell Mini 9 netbook and in the end it's only using up about 600MB, which is one or two hundred more megabytes than XP, which confirms reports about it being lighter weight than Windows Vista, and suitable for netbooks.

Unfortunately, a feature introduced in Vista remains in Windows 7 that could pose a problem to the lifespan of these netbooks. This feature is a Scheduled Task that is preconfigured to defrag the primary hard drive every Wednesday night. This is a good feature for "normal" hard drives, but is bad news for SSDs. Defragmenting a SSD (Solid State Disk) drive is hard on the drive. A normal hard drive can handle millions of reads/writes. An SSD drive is limited to only tens of thousands of overwrites per sector or data bit. Furthermore, SSD drives have zero (0) seek time, so defragmentation is entirely pointless on an SSD drive. If the hard drive is significantly full and the files are often fragmented, the defragmentation process will do a lot of damage to the SSD drive.

I reported this here:

https://connect.microsoft.com/feedback/ViewFeedback.aspx?FeedbackID=410949&SiteID=647&wa=wsignin1.0

Unfortunately, Microsoft updated the Status on this to "Won't Fix" and commented that they might look at it in the next version of Windows after Windows 7.

Well it's not worth fighting about, but at least be aware. If you do install Windows 7 on an SSD-based netbook or other SSD-based computer, just be sure you fire up the Task Scheduler administrative tool and track down that scheduled task to disable it.

Two More Things About Windows 7

by Jon Davis 17. January 2009 04:44

I wanted to add two more early comments on my experience with Windows 7 so far.

  1. My favorite new feature of Windows 7 is the ability to take a normal / restored window and maximize it by just dragging it to the top of the screen and letting it dock. I can restore it in the same way, just drag the title bar off the top of the screen and it becomes restored again. And if I want it to fill the right half of the screen, I can dock it to the right, and likewise for the left side. WAY too handy, it's one of those things that makes you wonder, why haven't we been doing it that way for years?
  2. My new big fat pet peeve that makes me think someone at Microsoft is a little nutty and insane is the Virtual Store security "feature" that was implemented in Windows Server 2008 has ended up in Windows 7 as well. I cannot express enough how much I ABSOLUTELY HATE THIS HORRIBLE FEATURE.
    • To fix it now you need to open "Security Configuration Management" where you'll find Local Policies -> Security Options -> "Virtualize file and registry write failures to per-user locations" and disable the thing.

On a side note, in a previous blog entry I told a "story" about how I had to use an external USB-based DVD drive to install Windows because the IDE drive wasn't detected. Well, with everything installed I was still unable to use my built-in drive. I could dual-boot to Vista and use the same drive all day, so this is clearly a driver issue. And I know I'm not the only one with the problem; as Google reveals, it's one of the big well-known let-downs of the Windows 7 beta.

Windows 7 Beta first Impressions

by Jon Davis 14. January 2009 04:47

Everyone has already made Windows 7 first impression comments, but I had to see Windows 7 for myself, as I always do wth Windows pre-releases. So here are my first experiences. I tried the earlier PDC release, downloaded from a torrent, but I got an error after booting from the DVD saying that it could not locate an installer file.

Windows could not collect information for [OSImage] since the specified image file [install.wim] does not exist.

I chalked it up to a bad torrent download and tossed the copy.

Then Microsoft released Beta 1 this month. I tried downloading this torrent again, and the download was inturrupted. I tried to restore the download process and no seeds were found after hours. I found another torrent, and after about half a day and half-downloaded I realized Microsoft had actually released this version to the open public for anyone to download, so deleted that torrent and started download again, this time straight from Microsoft.

The next day, the download having been completed while I was sleeping, I burned it to DVD-RW and gave it a run. Guess what?

Windows could not collect information for [OSImage] since the specified image file [install.wim] does not exist.

Oh, poop. So the original download wasn't any more flawed on this part than this one is, it's something else.

I tried booting the DVD in VMWare on another PC, and it worked! Aha! It's a hardware problem, perhaps a DVD driver problem. My computer is only about one and a half years old, but the DVD drive is about four years old. I Googled around a bit for more information on this ridiculous error, and the only advice I could find were two suggestions:

  1. Some commented, "You probably found an old DVD-RW from behind a sofa. Use a new DVD-R and that'll fix it right up." Hm. Doubtful. I burned another DVD-RW (same brand, roughly the same condition) and this time I checked off the "Verify" option on my burner software, and it checked out. Still got the error. It was at this point that I tried it on VMWare, and it got past this error, so no, it's not a bad disc. I suppose it could have to do with the failure of the other drive, on the other PC, to read the disc, though. In other words, the drive might have failed, not the disc.
  2. Someone said, "I was using an old USB-attached DVD drive that the BIOS enabled me to boot the disc from, but after installing an IDE-based DVD drive in the actual computer the error went away." Well that stinks, because I'm using an IDE-based DVD drive, it's never given me any problems except that it often refuses to burn discs.

So I pondered, I'm leaning towards the #2 scenario as a clue, I know Microsoft was trying to thin down the core surface area in Windows 7 and I bet this is a lack of some drivers for my drive. But I wonder if "new" is the keyword here, not the form (IDE vs USB).

I just happened to have a external USB-based DVD drive I recently purchased at Amazon. USB, but new. Could it work? I ran to the back room and grabbed it, brought it back in, stretched it across the room to the outlet, configured the BIOS to boot from USB, and booted the Windows 7 DVD. I went to install and....... yes!! It got past the error.

So here's the first first impression: While I greatly appreciate Microsoft's attempt to slim down the core dependency set of Windows and its drivers set, in this area (CD/DVD drive support) they chopped off WAY too much. Perhaps driver support isn't the issue here, but if it is, this IS a bug. There are a LOT of people who were power users 4 years ago, who invested in the latest and greatest back then, and had no Windows version but XP, and were reluctant to switch to Vista because of the corners that Windows 7 rounded out. These years-old systems are more than adequate, surely, for Windows 7 performance-wise, but the CD/DVD drivers are right there along with USB subsystem and SATA as being most needed for success. Fix this, guys, this is a BUG, not a mere risky compromise (intentional droppage of legacy hardware support). Microsoft can't afford to lose THIS hardware.

I experienced no other hardware glitches, fortunately, and even my audio hardware was working, and the Aero experience working right from post-setup first boot. There was only one other hardware-related annoyance, and that is that my two monitors were backwards.. I had to mouse far to the right to access the left monitor. Yes, this is configurable with the Control Panel, but I got annoyed watching setup and dealing with dialog boxes, etc., while everything was backwards and the setup didn't have the Control Panel available to me. It would've been nice, I suppose, if there was one optional button during setup that brought up the Monitors dialog, but at least the Monitors dialog isn't accessed through the wholly inappropriately named (in Vista's time) "Personalization" dialog, which was SO ridiculously placed since monitor setup (resolution, monitor placement monitor drivers, color depth, etc) has little to nothing to do with personalization. Might as well rename Control Panel to "Personalizations".. but they got it, I'm glad.

The new Windows 7 is all about rounding off the corners and adding the polishing touches that Windows Vista only touched on and inspired.

  1. More ever-present Aero Glass experience, with lots of smooth animations and roll-overs.
  2. Explorer.exe got a huge overhaul with Aero and usability enhancements.
    • As is very well known, the ubiquitous taskbar that has been around through Windows 95, Windows NT 4, Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, and Windows Server 2008 (did I miss one somewhere? surely I did ..) is now no more. There is no longer a taskbar. There is a bar down there, but it's more like a "smartbar"; the Quick Launch toolbar and the taskbar have sorta merged. It's all very much inspired, no doubt, by the Mac OS X's dock, which frankly disgusts me. But so far I don't have a hatred of the Windows 7 smartbar thingmajig. I do very strongly believe that someone (i.e. Stardock), if not Microsoft themselves, will be pushing a "Windows Vista taskbar" as an add-on accessory to Windows 7, for those people who preferred it, as there is now a rather obvious market for it.
    • The awesome feature in the Windows Vista desktop compositing system that enabled Direct3D and high definition video to be managed in an already D3D desktop environment, advantages of which were only slightly touched upon by Windows key + Tab and taskbar mouseover tooltip previews, both showing these windows re-displayed in distorted, small form in realtime with no performance loss, has been expanded upon in Windows 7. I'm still discovering these, but the most obvious feature is the smartbar mouseover with Internet Explorer showing each tab and letting you pick a tab as it is rendered in real-time. I hope to find a lot more such scenarios
  3. Paint, Calculator, and Wordpad have finally been rewritten with an Office 2007 feel. We no longer have to puke on the Windows 95 versions. I didn't see if Notepad was replaced with something anywhere near the simplicity yet completeness of Notepad2. But I doubt Notepad was touched, which if not is a shame. But at least there's always Notepad2. *cough*
  4. In general, the things in Windows such as in the Control Panel that got moved around a lot in Vista and that everyone complained about, such as me complaining about Monitor settings showing up under stupid Personalization, have been rearranged again. Generally, things are just better and more thought out. Vista was a trial run in this matter, Windows 7 beta is just more thought through. There are still quirky "features" but nothing I've found so far that is just blaringly wrong. I do think that the personalization bits are now too broken apart but this might just be a style issue that needs some getting used to. Microsoft seems to be leaning more than before towards the Apple/Mozilla approach of pursuing minimalist options while burying advanced features down in an obvious "Advanced" click-trail. Themes are consolidated sets now, a little more like Win95 Plus! themes in the sense of consolidation, and not so much isolated background, color, and sound options. But those options as individual settings are still there. In fact, Sounds is now (finally) a personalization configuration, as it should be.
  5. You start off with a big fish. Literally. It's a nice painting (of a fish). But come on. It's a fish! I went to choose a different background image, and, while I could very possibly be mistaken, I think the number of background images you can choose from has been slashed by half since Vista, and the new offerings in the theme picker don't look as good. Boooo!
  6. Other people ran the numbers so I didnt do any testing, but the general consensus is that Windows 7 performs closer to Windows XP's performance than Windows Vista's performance. (Read: It's very performant.)
  7. The max system rating has been nudged up from 5.9 to 7.9. My score of 5.7 on Windows Vista went up to 5.9 in Windows 7... but given the max of 7.9 my year-and-a-half old PC is no longer 0.2 from ceiling. *sob*
  8. I was impressed that the color palettes across all themes, just like IE 8 beta on Vista, are way too bright. It's ugly and uncomfortable. It's not easily configurable to make darker, either.
  9. I haven't stressed Windows 7 yet with software to see how stable it is, but one of the first apps I downloaded was Google Chrome and that puked. All of Windows froze up while I was doing something else, too, but I don't remember what it was, and that sort of thing is something I'd expect from a Beta. 

I have one other complaint. Windows Vista and Office 2007 introduced some really nice glow animations on buttons. Windows 7 pushes the Office 2007 glow animations and transition animations everywhere. The new smartbar (taskbar replacement) has a really, really cool "you just clicked me!" gradient animation that is almost magical. It's nice, but the animations are so slow they're actually rather obnoxious. For example, in the new Calculator, if you simply hover over and click on a button, yeah, blue-gray turns amber, but mouse-away and it seems to take a full three or four seconds for it to animate back to the original color. It's artistically nice, but it's just too long, and I think it will be too distracting. It might actually produce some serious usability issues, fast-moving users are going to be forced to slow down because their "feedback loop" they're getting on the screen is going to all be just a big blur. I really don't like that. It's already making me a little nauseous. Weird huh.

I think Vista's close/maximize/minimize effects the animation timings just right in this matter. Office 2007 ribbon buttons were just over the edge in my taste (too slow), and I could be wrong but Windows 7 in various places feels like it tripled the Office 2007 animation timings (very, very slow).

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Computers and Internet | General Technology | Operating Systems


 

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About the author

Jon Davis (aka "stimpy77") has been a programmer, developer, and consultant for web and Windows software solutions professionally since 1997, with experience ranging from OS and hardware support to DHTML programming to IIS/ASP web apps to Java network programming to Visual Basic applications to C# desktop apps.
 
Software in all forms is also his sole hobby, whether playing PC games or tinkering with programming them. "I was playing Defender on the Commodore 64," he reminisces, "when I decided at the age of 12 or so that I want to be a computer programmer when I grow up."

Jon was previously employed as a senior .NET developer at a very well-known Internet services company whom you're more likely than not to have directly done business with. However, this blog and all of jondavis.net have no affiliation with, and are not representative of, his former employer in any way.

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